Music in the Times of Covid-19

Gochild, performed by Virtual Jazz Trio of Rick Crane on bass, Vinnie Cutro on trumpet, and Joe Verrusio on guitar.

The musicians recorded this video in their own homes, during the time of the Corona Virus Pandemic.

The song Godchild was composed by George Wallington.

The following information is from the site Wikipedia:

His best-known compositions are “Lemon Drop” (which gained attention when played by Woody Herman in the late 1940s), and “Godchild” (one of the pieces played for The Birth of the Cool recordings led by Miles Davis). Birth of the Cool is a compilation album by American jazz musician Miles Davis, released in February or March 1957 on Capitol Records. It compiles eleven tracks recorded by Davis’s nonet for the label over the course of three sessions during 1949 and 1950. Featuring unusual instrumentation and several notable musicians, the music consisted of innovative arrangements influenced by classical music techniques such as polyphony, and marked a major development in post-bebop jazz. As the title suggests, these recordings are considered seminal in the history of cool jazz. Most of them were originally released in the 10-inch 78-rpm format and are all approximately three minutes long.

Wallington was born Giacinto Figlia in Sicily, and then moved to the United States (New York) with his family in 1925. His father sang opera and introduced his son to classical music, but Wallington listened to jazz after hearing the music of saxophonist Lester Young.

He said that he acquired the name Wallington in high school: “I like to wear flashy clothes and the kids in the neighborhood would say, ‘Hey, look at Wallington!'” He left school at the age of 15 to play piano in New York.

In 1960 Wallington stopped playing music and moved to Florida to work in the family air conditioning business, citing the stress of endless touring. He returned to music in 1984 and recorded three albums, Virtuoso in 1984, Symphony of a Jazz Piano in 1986 and Pleasure of a Jazz Inspiration in 1992. He also performed at the 1985 Kool Jazz Festival in New York

Entertainment in the time of COVID-19

We are musicians, our friends are musicians and the lock-down isn't going to stop us from doing what we love.

When the pandemic started we were out working at clubs, weddings, parties, etc. You name it, if someone wanted music, we were there for them. Most of us have degrees from some of the most prestigious music programs in the country. Those of us who don't have the degrees spent years studying under our mentors and learning our craft while performing. Some of our musicians have Grammys or are Grammy nominated artists. Currently these artists are making $0 income. They still have families to support.

Music is in the DNA of our friends and colleagues. While performing for the public has come to a screeching halt, we continue to compose, create and play our instruments. Just like athletes who must continue their daily workouts to remain in shape, we continue to practice every day in anticipation of our return to the work that we love.

In this video we are featuring three Jazz Musicians, they are: Rick Crane on upright bass, Vinnie Cutro on the trumpet and Joe Verrusio on the guitar. All three men have been performing together in the New York Area for over 40 years. In the course of their careers they have become dear friends.

The idea to create virtual videos came to Joe Verrusio. When the lock-down started, he was seeing a number of Zoom videos featuring orchestras and choirs and could not find any Jazz Trios doing the same thing. He still wanted too perform with his band mates to keep up his "chops." This is how this video came to be. To this date we have made three virtual videos, improving on each one based on what we learned from the previous ones. The first video in the series was Misty. If you watch the video you can see that the lighting is poor on Joe, while the lighting is much better on Rick Crane. The difference is that Joe taped himself using the Zoom app., while Rick used his iPhone. Our second video was When You Wish Upon a Star.
On When You Wish Upon a Star the lighting is much improved, because Joe used his iPad to self film.

Now we come to the third video in the series, On a Misty Night. In this video we feature three artists: Rick Crane on upright bass, Vinnie Cutro on trumpet and Joe Verrusio on the guitar.
The addition of a third instrument really enriches the overall sound and vibe that we want too convey to our viewers.

Wedding Ceremony Magic ~ Trumpet Voluntary, Jeremiah Clarke

http://https://vimeo.com/99420911

 

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The Prince of Denmark’s March is more commonly known as the Trumpet Voluntary by Jeremiah Clarke.

This piece of classical music is for the bride that wants to make a grand entrance into the church. Here it is being performed by a duo consisting of a trumpeter and the church organist. The musicians were up in the balcony, the acoustics in the church were spectacular and the music selection was very moving.

Please Note:  We usually recommend to our newly engaged couples that they hire the church organist. These musicians are familiar with the nuances of the particular instrument. Church organs vary greatly, so it is highly recommended that you contract the person most familiar with your church’s organ.

The Order of the Music at a Wedding Ceremony

Processional refers to the music that is being played as the bridal party enters the church, once all the guests are seated. One piece of music for the bridal party, then another for the bride.

The prelude refers to the music performed before the recessional, as the guests are being seated.

The recessional refers to the music at the conclusion of the wedding ceremony. The bride and groom exit first, followed by the bridal party, the parents, and the congregation. Modern couples are changing the rules to suit their needs, the family dynamics and their religion.

About this Song

It is customarily played as the bride enters the church with her father, the processional. The Prince of Denmark’s March was composed by Jeremiah Clarke. It is called The Prince of Denmark’s March, but commonly known as The Trumpet Voluntary.  It was composed for the keyboard, probably, around 1700. This music can be heard at a number of royal weddings, most notably at the 1981 wedding of Prince Charles and Lady Diana.

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Jeremiah Clarke

Jeremiah Clarke (c. 1674 – 1 December 1707) was an English baroque composer and organist.

Biography

Thought to have been born in London around 1674, Clarke was a pupil of John Blow at St Paul’s Cathedral. He later became an organist at the Chapel Royal. After his death, he was succeeded in that post by William Croft.

Clarke is best remembered for a popular keyboard piece: the Prince of Denmark’s March, which is commonly called the Trumpet Voluntary, written about 1700. From c. 1878 until the 1940s the work was attributed to Henry Purcell, and was published as Trumpet Voluntary by Henry Purcell in William Sparkes’s Short Pieces for the Organ, Book VII, No. 1 (London, Ashdown and Parry). This version came to the attention of Sir Henry J. Wood, who made two orchestral transcriptions of it, both of which were recorded. The recordings further cemented the erroneous notion that the original piece was by Purcell. Clarke’s piece is a popular choice for wedding music, and has been used in royal weddings. Most notably the wedding of Prince Charles and Lady Diana Spencer in 1981.

The famous Trumpet Tune in D (also incorrectly attributed to Purcell) was taken from the semi-opera The Island Princess, which was a joint musical production of Clarke and Daniel Purcell (Henry Purcell’s younger brother)—probably leading to the confusion.