Brides Need to Know!

 

A trio of classical musicians performing Jeremiah Clarke’s Trumpet Voluntary
and Pachelbel’s Canon.  Both classical pieces of music are performed on the Cello, Flute and Harp. This slide show is an example of  music that would be appropriate for a wedding ceremony or the cocktail hour of a wedding reception.

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The Order of the Music at a Wedding Ceremony:

Processional refers to the music that is being played as the bridal party enters the church, once all the guests are seated. One piece of music for the bridal party, then another for the bride.

The prelude refers to the music performed prior to the recessional, as the guests are being seated.

The recessional refers to the music at the conclusion of the wedding ceremony. The bride and groom exit first, followed by the bridal party, the parents, and the congregation. Modern couples are changing the rules to suit their needs, the family dynamics and their religion.

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About the Trumpet Voluntary:

“The Prince of Denmark’s March” is more commonly known as the Trumpet Voluntary by Jeremiah Clarke.
It is customarily played as the bride enters the church with her father, the processional. “The Prince of Denmark’s March” was composed by Jeremiah Clarke. It is called The Prince of Denmark’s March; but better known as The Trumpet Voluntary. It was composed for the keyboard, probably,around 1700. This music can be heard at a number of royal weddings, most notably at the 1981 wedding of Prince Charles and Lady Diana.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Biography:

Jeremiah Clarke (c. 1674 — 1 December 1707) was an English baroque composer and organist.

Thought to have been born in London around 1674, Clarke was a pupil of John Blow at St Paul’s Cathedral. He later became an organist at the Chapel Royal. After his death, he was succeeded in that post by William Croft.

Clarke is best remembered for a popular keyboard piece: the Prince of Denmark’s March, which is commonly called the Trumpet Voluntary, written about 1700. From c. 1878 until the 1940s the work was attributed to Henry Purcell, and was published as Trumpet Voluntary by Henry Purcell in William Sparkes’s Short Pieces for the Organ, Book VII, No. 1 (London, Ashdown and Parry). This version came to the attention of Sir Henry J. Wood, who made two orchestral transcriptions of it, both of which were recorded. The recordings further cemented the erroneous notion that the original piece was by Purcell. Clarke’s piece is a popular choice for wedding music, and has been used in royal weddings. Most notably the wedding of Prince Charles and Lady Diana Spencer in 1981.

The famous Trumpet Tune in D (also incorrectly attributed to Purcell) was taken from the semi-opera The Island Princess, which was a joint musical production of Clarke and Daniel Purcell (Henry Purcell’s younger brother)—probably leading to the confusion.

Pachelbel’s Canon

Pachelbel’s Canon is the name commonly given to a canon by the German Baroque composer Johann Pachelbel in his Canon and Gigue for 3 violins and basso continuo (German: Kanon und Gigue für 3 Violinen mit Generalbaß) sometimes referred to as Canon and Gigue in D or simply Canon in D. It is his most famous composition. It was originally scored for three violins and basso continuo and paired with a gigue. Both movements are in the key of D major.

Like most other works by Pachelbel and other pre-1700 composers, the Canon remained forgotten for centuries and was rediscovered only in the 20th century. Several decades after it was first published in 1919 the piece became extremely popular. The piece’s chordal progression has been appropriated in numerous commercial pop hits, particularly during the 1990s, such as in Pet Shop Boys cover of “Go West”, Coolio’s “C U When U Get There” and Green Day’s “Basket Case”.

This piece was composed by Johann Pachelbel(1653-1706)

 


 

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Credits:

Photography courtesy of Pixabay

Slideshow and blog created by Ana Maria Verrusio

Join us in a Joy Filled Christmas Celebration!

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Email: ecmusicnj@gmail.com
Call: (908)464-0038, (908)451-1955

Join us in this joyful celebration of the Christmas season!

This group of high school students and their choir director lead the members of a New Jersey country club in their Christmas sing along. The students walk into the crowd and encourage the guests to join in the caroling.

The night began with a wonderful meal to the sounds of a jazz pianist. An after dinner concert is next and the evening ends with a Christmas Carol sing along. We could not think of a better way to spread holiday cheer.

Share the joy of Christmas early in the season and put your guests in a festive mood that will endure well into the New Year.

We offer a variety of ‘Candlelight Dinner’ options all of them custom tailored for your musical preference and your budget.

To reserve one of our groups, or to discuss your Candlelight Dinner options, contact Joe at:

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ecmusicnj@gmail.com

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(908)464-0038, (908)451-1955

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

“Joy to the World” is a popular American Christmas song.

The words are by English hymn writer Isaac Watts, based on Psalm 98 in the Bible. The song was first published in 1719 in Watts’ collection; The Psalms of David: Imitated in the language of the New Testament, and applied to the Christian state and worship. Watts wrote the words of “Joy to the World” as a hymn glorifying Christ’s triumphant return at the end of the age, rather than a song celebrating His first coming. Only the second half of Watts’ lyrics are still used today.

The music was adapted and arranged to Watts’ lyrics by Lowell Mason in 1839 from an older melody which was then believed to have originated from Handel, not least because the theme of the refrain (And heaven and nature sing…) appears in the orchestra opening and accompaniment of the recitative Comfort ye from Handel’s Messiah, and the first four notes match the beginning of the choruses Lift up your heads and Glory to God from the same oratorio. However, Handel did not compose the entire tune. The name “Antioch” is generally used for the tune.

As of the late 20th century, “Joy to the World” was the most-published Christmas hymn in North America.

 

The Rumors are True!

…Christmas is coming fast.  It will be here before you realize.  If you want a great event, you need to book your entertainment now.

 

 

Gloria in excelsis Deo, performed by Mendham Voices

 

One of our high school choirs performs a gospel version of the J.S. Bach’s “Gloria in Excelsis Deo.” Recorded at Roxiticus Golf Club’s Candlelight Dinner Concert.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

“Gloria in excelsis Deo” (Latin for “Glory to God in the highest”) is a hymn known also as the Greater Doxology (as distinguished from the “Minor Doxology” or Gloria Patri) and the Angelic Hymn. The name is often abbreviated to Gloria in Excelsis or simply Gloria.

The hymn begins with the words that the angels sang when the birth of Christ was announced to shepherds in Luke 2:14. Other verses were added very early, forming a doxology.

Gloria in excelsis Deo (Glory to God in the Highest), is a church cantata written by the German Baroque composer Johann Sebastian Bach, and the only one of his church cantatas set to a Latin text. He composed the Christmas cantata in Leipzig probably in 1745 to celebrate the end of the Second Silesian War on Christmas Day.  The composition’s three movements all derive from the Gloria of an earlier Missa written by Bach in 1733, which the composer would later use as the Gloria of his Mass in B minor.

To reserve one of our choirs, contact Joe at:

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Continue reading “The Rumors are True!”

Classical Quintet Performing a Waltz

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Waltz performed by Classical Quintet

Taped at a Candlelight Dinner celebration this past Christmas.

Imagine dining while this music is being performed for you and your guests. The voices you hear in the background are those of the guests at this Candlelight Dinner event.

Our Candlelight Dinner consists of the following:

Dickens Singers:
Will serenade your guests as they arrive at your party. Later as the evening progresses, they stroll through the various rooms.

Classical Musicians:
Such as the ones you see and hear in this video clip, perform while guests dine.

Choir:
We bring in a high quality choir to perform a concert for you and your guests to enjoy. When the concert ends, guests are invited to join the choir in a holiday sing-along.

The evening recharges everyone with the joys of the holiday season.

To plan your own Candlelight Dinner, contact Joe Verrusio at:

Email:
ecmusicnj@gmail.com
Phone:
(908) 464-0038
(908) 451-1955

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Here We Come A-wassailing

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Here We Come A-wassailing, Dickens Carolers

Our Dickens Carolers will bring the Victorian Era to your holiday events.  This talented group of singers can walk through larger venues and bring holiday cheer to your guests.  Wether you are hosting an employee party or simply a special evening, our singers will bring the authentic look and sound that you see in this video.  They have a large variety of songs to choose from, they look authentic, and sound great.

This video was taped live at a New Jersey County Club.  When guests arrived at the club, they were met with the sounds of Christmas Carols being sung by this group.  Later on, the Carolers walked from room to room performing a mini-concert in each dining room.

To reserve our Dickens Carolers for your own Merry Christmas event, contact Entertainment Consultants at:

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ecmusicnj@gmail.com

Phone:

(908) 464-0038

(908) 451-1955

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Here We Come A-wassailing

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Here We Come A-wassailing (or Here We Come A-caroling) is an English traditional Christmas carol and New Years song, apparently composed c. 1850. The old English wassail song refers to ‘wassailing’, or singing carols door to door wishing good health.

 

According to Readers Digest; “the Christmas spirit often made the rich a little more generous than usual, and bands of beggars and orphans used to dance their way through the snowy streets of England, offering to sing good cheer and to tell good fortune if the householder would give them a drink from his wassail bowl or a penny or a pork pie or, let them stand for a few minutes beside the warmth of his hearth. The wassail bowl itself was a hearty combination of hot ale or beer, apples, spices and mead, just alcoholic enough to warm tingling toes and fingers of the singers