Brides Need to Know!

 

A trio of classical musicians performing Jeremiah Clarke’s Trumpet Voluntary
and Pachelbel’s Canon.  Both classical pieces of music are performed on the Cello, Flute and Harp. This slide show is an example of  music that would be appropriate for a wedding ceremony or the cocktail hour of a wedding reception.

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The Order of the Music at a Wedding Ceremony:

Processional refers to the music that is being played as the bridal party enters the church, once all the guests are seated. One piece of music for the bridal party, then another for the bride.

The prelude refers to the music performed prior to the recessional, as the guests are being seated.

The recessional refers to the music at the conclusion of the wedding ceremony. The bride and groom exit first, followed by the bridal party, the parents, and the congregation. Modern couples are changing the rules to suit their needs, the family dynamics and their religion.

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About the Trumpet Voluntary:

“The Prince of Denmark’s March” is more commonly known as the Trumpet Voluntary by Jeremiah Clarke.
It is customarily played as the bride enters the church with her father, the processional. “The Prince of Denmark’s March” was composed by Jeremiah Clarke. It is called The Prince of Denmark’s March; but better known as The Trumpet Voluntary. It was composed for the keyboard, probably,around 1700. This music can be heard at a number of royal weddings, most notably at the 1981 wedding of Prince Charles and Lady Diana.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Biography:

Jeremiah Clarke (c. 1674 — 1 December 1707) was an English baroque composer and organist.

Thought to have been born in London around 1674, Clarke was a pupil of John Blow at St Paul’s Cathedral. He later became an organist at the Chapel Royal. After his death, he was succeeded in that post by William Croft.

Clarke is best remembered for a popular keyboard piece: the Prince of Denmark’s March, which is commonly called the Trumpet Voluntary, written about 1700. From c. 1878 until the 1940s the work was attributed to Henry Purcell, and was published as Trumpet Voluntary by Henry Purcell in William Sparkes’s Short Pieces for the Organ, Book VII, No. 1 (London, Ashdown and Parry). This version came to the attention of Sir Henry J. Wood, who made two orchestral transcriptions of it, both of which were recorded. The recordings further cemented the erroneous notion that the original piece was by Purcell. Clarke’s piece is a popular choice for wedding music, and has been used in royal weddings. Most notably the wedding of Prince Charles and Lady Diana Spencer in 1981.

The famous Trumpet Tune in D (also incorrectly attributed to Purcell) was taken from the semi-opera The Island Princess, which was a joint musical production of Clarke and Daniel Purcell (Henry Purcell’s younger brother)—probably leading to the confusion.

Pachelbel’s Canon

Pachelbel’s Canon is the name commonly given to a canon by the German Baroque composer Johann Pachelbel in his Canon and Gigue for 3 violins and basso continuo (German: Kanon und Gigue für 3 Violinen mit Generalbaß) sometimes referred to as Canon and Gigue in D or simply Canon in D. It is his most famous composition. It was originally scored for three violins and basso continuo and paired with a gigue. Both movements are in the key of D major.

Like most other works by Pachelbel and other pre-1700 composers, the Canon remained forgotten for centuries and was rediscovered only in the 20th century. Several decades after it was first published in 1919 the piece became extremely popular. The piece’s chordal progression has been appropriated in numerous commercial pop hits, particularly during the 1990s, such as in Pet Shop Boys cover of “Go West”, Coolio’s “C U When U Get There” and Green Day’s “Basket Case”.

This piece was composed by Johann Pachelbel(1653-1706)

 


 

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Credits:

Photography courtesy of Pixabay

Slideshow and blog created by Ana Maria Verrusio

Wedding Ceremony Magic ~ Trumpet Voluntary, Jeremiah Clarke

http://https://vimeo.com/99420911

 

To reserve musicians for your wedding

or another special event, contact us at:

Email:  ecmusicnj@gmail.com

Call:  (908)464-0038, (908)451-1955

The Prince of Denmark’s March is more commonly known as the Trumpet Voluntary by Jeremiah Clarke.

This piece of classical music is for the bride that wants to make a grand entrance into the church. Here it is being performed by a duo consisting of a trumpeter and the church organist. The musicians were up in the balcony, the acoustics in the church were spectacular and the music selection was very moving.

Please Note:  We usually recommend to our newly engaged couples that they hire the church organist. These musicians are familiar with the nuances of the particular instrument. Church organs vary greatly, so it is highly recommended that you contract the person most familiar with your church’s organ.

The Order of the Music at a Wedding Ceremony

Processional refers to the music that is being played as the bridal party enters the church, once all the guests are seated. One piece of music for the bridal party, then another for the bride.

The prelude refers to the music performed before the recessional, as the guests are being seated.

The recessional refers to the music at the conclusion of the wedding ceremony. The bride and groom exit first, followed by the bridal party, the parents, and the congregation. Modern couples are changing the rules to suit their needs, the family dynamics and their religion.

About this Song

It is customarily played as the bride enters the church with her father, the processional. The Prince of Denmark’s March was composed by Jeremiah Clarke. It is called The Prince of Denmark’s March, but commonly known as The Trumpet Voluntary.  It was composed for the keyboard, probably, around 1700. This music can be heard at a number of royal weddings, most notably at the 1981 wedding of Prince Charles and Lady Diana.

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Jeremiah Clarke

Jeremiah Clarke (c. 1674 – 1 December 1707) was an English baroque composer and organist.

Biography

Thought to have been born in London around 1674, Clarke was a pupil of John Blow at St Paul’s Cathedral. He later became an organist at the Chapel Royal. After his death, he was succeeded in that post by William Croft.

Clarke is best remembered for a popular keyboard piece: the Prince of Denmark’s March, which is commonly called the Trumpet Voluntary, written about 1700. From c. 1878 until the 1940s the work was attributed to Henry Purcell, and was published as Trumpet Voluntary by Henry Purcell in William Sparkes’s Short Pieces for the Organ, Book VII, No. 1 (London, Ashdown and Parry). This version came to the attention of Sir Henry J. Wood, who made two orchestral transcriptions of it, both of which were recorded. The recordings further cemented the erroneous notion that the original piece was by Purcell. Clarke’s piece is a popular choice for wedding music, and has been used in royal weddings. Most notably the wedding of Prince Charles and Lady Diana Spencer in 1981.

The famous Trumpet Tune in D (also incorrectly attributed to Purcell) was taken from the semi-opera The Island Princess, which was a joint musical production of Clarke and Daniel Purcell (Henry Purcell’s younger brother)—probably leading to the confusion.

 

Choosing your Ceremony Music

BW weddig piano

The Wedding Ceremony

Religious Ceremonies:

We  always recommend that you hire the musicians that work for the church(or temple).  You will have to pay them their fee, but it will be well worth it.  These musicians are familiar with the specific musical equipment and with the liturgical order  of the ceremony. This is especially important if  you are having an organist.  Large church organs can be one of a kind, and should only be played by a person familiar with that specific instrument.   In the event the church musicians are unavailable, make sure that the person you hire knows liturgical music. These musicians must be well versed in the nuances of your religious ceremony.

Some brides choose more musicians, such as trumpeters, vocalists, harpist, flautist.  While these extra musicians are not necessary, they will make your wedding ceremony a memorable one.  One of our favorite “extra” is a trumpeter(or more) to play a fanfare as the bride enters the church.  This will give your ceremony a regal touch.

If your  ceremony is to take place in a place other than a church or temple, we still suggest you hire musicians that are familiar with the order of the liturgy.  Choose music celebrates the season as well as the venue.  For example:   at a summer or a beach wedding, a steel drummer might be a great choice.

$Money Saving Tips$   Have your ceremony musicians play the cocktail hour of your wedding reception.

Below is a list of our favorite music for a wedding ceremony

Classical Music

  • “Air” (from Water Music Suite), (George F. Handel)
  •  “Bridal Chorus” (from Lohengrin), (Richard Wagner)
  • “Canon in D” (Johann Pachelbel)
  •  “Procession of Joy” (Hal Hopson)
  •  “Rigaudon” (Andre Campra)
  •  “Spring” (from The Four Seasons), (Antonio Vivaldi)
  •  “Te Deum” (Marc-Antoine Charpentier)
  •  “The Prince of Denmark’s March” (Jeremiah Clarke)
  •  “Trumpet Tune” (Henry Purcell)
  •  “Trumpet Voluntary” (Jeremiah Clarke)
  •  “Trumpet Voluntary” (John Stanley)
  •  “Wedding March” (from The Marriage of Figaro), (Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart)

Religious, Sacred Music

  •  “All People That On Earth Do Dwell” (“Old 100th” hymn)
  •  “Dona Nobis Pacem” (16th century hymn)
  •  “Hana’ava Babanot” (A Love Song), (Neeman)
  •  “St. Anthony’s Chorale” (Franz Joseph Haydn)
  •  “Hymn Fanfare from The Triumphant” (Francois Couperin)
  •  “Scalero de Oro” (traditional Sephardic)

Choosing the right music should not create more stress,  whether you hire a DJ or a band,  these professionals are there to guide you in your choices.  Most music professionals have song lists for you to choose from.  You should have a brief list of songs you want to hear, as well as the songs you don’t want to hear.

Harp and Electric Violin Duo

Continue reading “Harp and Electric Violin Duo”